Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 160b

composed by F.Y. Sing (after J-M. Maréchal,  Problem #387)
presented for solving in July 2018

DR3

♠ none

 Q82

 AQ9876

♣ Q1032

♠ AQJ10987

 AJ

 32

♣ 54

♠ 654

 K107

 K1054

♣ 876

♠ K32

 96543

 J

♣ AKJ9

West to lead and East-West to defeat South's contract of four hearts.

Successful solvers:  Steve Bloom, Ian Budden, Ed Lawhon, Sebastian Nowacki, A.V. Ramana Rao, Zoran Sibinović, Rajeswar Tewari, Andries van der Vegt, Dick Yuen.  Solvers DR suggestions ranged from 2 to 4.

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Solution

West must lead a club that South wins with the K.  Declarer’s best chance is to set up North’s diamonds, so a diamond to the A is followed by another, South intending to ruff East’s 10.  But East plays low, letting South discard a spade.  North does best now to lead a low trump but East plays the 7, West the A!  West must return a club, South doing best to win with the A and lead another heart.  North plays low but East overtakes West’s J and leads a spade.  North has to ruff with the Q, promoting East’s 10.  North’s diamonds can now be established via two ruffs, but the resulting winners cannot be reached, as East ruffs the fourth club to give West a spade trick.

Trap: If East covers North’s diamond at trick three, South ruffs and leads a trump.  West wins with the A and leads a second club, but declarer can win this in either hand and lead a second trump.  East wins with the K as in the above solution but North can ruff the spade return with the Q and lead a third diamond, covered by East and ruffed by South.  North is now entered on the third round of clubs to play the diamond winners until East ruffs with the good 10.  South’s 9 ruffs the spade return and if that is at trick twelve, then South’s remaining card is a club winner.

See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

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© Hugh Darwen, 2018
Date last modified: 10 September, 2018