Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 149b

composed by Vincent Labbé
presented for solving in July 2017

DR5

♠ Q10

 K3

 A975432

♣ Q6

♠ K

 9854

 KQ

♣ KJ10987

♠ A2

 QJ10

 J106

♣ A5432

♠ J9876543

 A762

 8

♣ none

South to make five spades against any defence.

Successful solvers:  Steve Bloom, Radu Mihai, Sebastian Nowacki, Eugeniusz Paprotny, A.V. Ramana Rao, Rajeswar Tewari, Andries van der Vegt, Dick Yuen, Wim van der Zijden.

Suggested DRs ranged from 2 to 6 and most solvers found this one significantly more difficult than 149a.  A common mistake, of which I was also guilty (sorry!), was to assume a heart discard from East in line B.1, thus omitting B.1(c) which I have now added below.   Tables

DDC Home Next problem Previous problem
Tables Next DR5 Previous DR5
Competition problem archive Next Labbé problem Previous Labbé problem

Solution

West must lead the K to prevent declarer from getting two heart ruffs for the contract.  North plays the Q.

A.      If the K holds, declarer will be able to set up North’s diamonds, using the A and K as entries, winning the first heart in hand if necessary.  Then North can be entered on a heart ruff to lead a winning diamond.

B.      If East (better) overtakes the K and leads the 2, South wins with the J and plays three more rounds of trumps, North discarding diamonds, West and East clubs.  The position is now:

♠ none

 K3

 A975

♣ Q6

♠ none

 9854

 KQ

♣ KJ

♠ none

 QJ10

 J106

♣ A5

♠ 543

A762

 8

♣ none

South leads another spade to start the squeeze.  West must of course keep four hearts and East must keep three diamonds.  North discards the 5.

1.       If West discards a club, East must discard a heart.  On the penultimate spade West is squeezed again.  The hearts must still be kept and the K guards against a ruffing finesse with Q6 against A5, so West throws a diamond.  In that case North discards the 3 and now East is squeezed:

(a)      A heart discard lets declarer score North’s red suit winners, ruff a club, then lead the 6, leaving A7 over West’s 95 when West takes it.

(b)     A club discard lets North establish a club trick.

(c)     A diamond discard lets South play a diamond to the A, ruff a diamond, cross to the K, cash the good diamond, then exit on a club.  Whichever defender wins this, at trick thirteen either South makes the A or North makes a club trick.

2.       If West discards a diamond, East again throws a heart.  On the next spade, if West discards a club we have the position as in B.1, but if West instead discards another diamond, North throws a club and so does East.  Now South can score the top hearts and club ruff, then overtake the 8 with the 9 to endplay East in diamonds, with A7 over East’s J6 when East takes the trick.

See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

DDC Home Next problem Previous problem
  Next DR5 Previous DR5
Competition problem archive Next Labbé problem Previous Labbé problem

© Hugh Darwen, 2017
Date last modified: 10 November, 2017