Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 106b

composed by Stefan Ralescu and Hugh Darwen
presented for solving in December, 2013

In each of the layouts (a) and (b) below your task is the same:
1. Show how East-West can defeat South's contract of six no-trumps.
2. Show how the contract is made against any other defence.

DR3 
(a)

♠ AQ76543

 3

 AQ3

♣ Q4

♠ J1098

 none

 J10987

♣ KJ109

♠ K

 10987654

 65

♣ 765

♠ 2

 AKQJ2

 K42

♣ A832


(b)

♠ Q765432

 3

 AQ3

♣ Q4

♠ J1098

 none

 J10987

♣ KJ109

♠ K

 10987654

 65

♣ 765

♠ A

 AKQJ2

 K42

♣ A832

Successful solvers:  Jean-Marc Bihl, Steve Bloom, Ian Budden, Leigh Matheson, Radu Mihai, Sebastian Nowacki, F.Y. Sing, Dick Yuen, Wim van der Zijden. Updated tables.

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Solution

In (a):

1.      West must lead the K!  If this is allowed to hold, West must switch to spades to break up the threatened black suit squeeze.  If instead South wins with the A, the best chance is to play a diamond to the A followed by four heart tricks.  However, there is no squeeze so long as West discards nothing but diamonds on the hearts and then a club on the K.

2.      Assume West leads a spade.  Then North wins and cashes the A (key play) on which South plays the 2.  Four rounds of hearts follow and West again does best to discard diamonds, coming down to four clubs and three spades.  North discards spades.  Now South leads the K.

(i)      If West discards a spade, North plays the 3.  Now a diamond to the Q is followed by Q and another spade to force a club lead from West.  The Q becomes not only a winner but also an entry to North’s good spade.

(ii)     If West discards a club, North drops the Q.  South leads a low club and regardless of whether West ducks or wins with the K, South’s heart loser goes on the Q and the long club can be established with the 4 as entry.

The only difference in layout (b) is that West must start with a low club!  On the lead of a spade or the K, the diamond at trick two comes from South, of course.  On a spade lead the play is then exactly as in (ii) above.  On the K lead North can win the first diamond with either the A or the Q.  Then, because South, in the ending, still has the A and North the Q, it doesn’t matter which hand wins the second diamond trick, just so long as South leads the K and North plays high or low depending on West’s discard.

See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

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© Hugh Darwen, 2014

Date last modified: 11 March, 2017