Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 104b

composed by Ian Budden
presented for solving in October, 2013

DR2

♠ 5432

 543

 J43

♣ A107

♠ 76

 J10

 KQ765

♣ J986

♠ KQJ1098

 K

 1098

♣ Q43

♠ A

 AQ98762

 A2

♣ K52

South is in a contract of six hearts.
A. How is the contract made on the lead of the 7?   
B. Which opening lead by West defeats the contract? 

Successful solvers:  Jean-Marc Bihl, Steve Bloom, Peter Li, Leigh Matheson, Sebastian Nowacki, Mihai Radu, Barry Rigal, F.Y. Sing, Dick Yuen, Wim van der Zijden

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Solution

(i) Winning the spade lead, declarer cashes A and Q, leads the 2 to the 5, ruffs a spade, and cashes two more hearts, throwing a spade and the ♣7 from dummy.  The position is now:

♠ 5

 none

 J43

♣ A10

♠ none

 none

 KQ7

♣ J98

♠ K

 none

 109

♣ Q43

♠ none

 7

 A2

♣ K52

South cashes the last trump.  If West discards a diamond, North discards a spade and declarer can play A and another diamond to set up a second diamond trick in dummy.  So West does better to discard the ♣8.  North and East discard diamonds.  South then leads the 2, which West must win.  If West returns:

A.      a diamond to South’s A, this squeezes East in the black suits.

B.      the ♣9, covered by the ♣10, ♣Q, and ♣K, declarer takes the last three tricks with the ♣A, A, and the ♣5.

C.      the ♣J to North’s ♣A, then the lead of the ♣10 pins the ♣9, again setting up a trick for the ♣5, with the A as entry if needed.

A hand analogous to this appears in Practical Bridge Endings by Chien-Hwa Wang, but the solution offered there, on a spade lead, involves giving up an early diamond trick.  Ian Budden correctly found that this play fails when West returns the J, and then discovered the real solution, as above.  So the solution to part (ii) is simply that West must lead the J.

See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

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© Hugh Darwen, 2013

Date last modified: 11 March, 2017