Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 102a

composed by Jean-Marc Bihl
presented for solving, August 2013

DR8

♠ K42

 A9874

 5432

♣ 2

♠ AQ

 Q1065

 KQ1098

♣ K5

♠ 10876

 J3

 76

♣ J8763

♠ J953

 K2

 AJ

♣ AQ1094

West to lead and defeat South's four spades.  Show why this play is necessary.

Successful solvers:  None!  Several solvers found the correct defence but nobody found the correct line in B.1 below.  In fact, Dick Yuen was the only person even to attempt this line, the defence of ruffing in with the Q being less than obvious apparently, but unfortunately he exited on a diamond instead of a trump, allowing West to win, return a red suit winner, then ruff in with the A when South leads another club.

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Solution

West must cash the A and then lead the K!  Declarerís position is now hopeless, but what if West had done something different at trick one or two?

A.      If West plays A and Q, there is more than one line to success.  For example, declarer could simply duck a club at trick 3, win the diamond return, and play A, Q and 10, North discarding diamonds.  If East exits on a trump, Southís black suit winners squeeze West; otherwise North will get a diamond ruff and can arrange to be on lead at trick 12 for a trump coup against Eastís 108.

B.      If West starts with the K, declarer plays, in some order, the A, a club ruff, A and K, ending in hand to lead a low club.

1.       If West ruffs with the Q, North overruffs and exits on a trump to Westís A.  West can cash a diamond but the next lead in either red suit fixes East.  If East ruffs in, South overruffs and plays two more rounds of trumps to force a club lead into the Q10.  Otherwise, East discards a club and South ruffs low; then Q and 10 force East to ruff and lead away from 108.

2.       If West discards, North ruffs and leads a heart, South ruffing low or overruffing East.  Now comes the Q, which West does best to ruff with the Q.  North overruffs and exits on a diamond to West.  North-South have made eight tricks and South must make two more trump tricks whatever the defence does now.  For example, if West cashes the A and East ruffs the next lead, South simply discards the club loser and is left with J and another spade.

See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

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© Hugh Darwen, 2013

Date last modified: 11 March, 2017