Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 101a

composed by Paolo Treossi
presented for solving in July, 2013

DR4

♠ K732

 Q43

 AK

♣ AK65

♠ none

 KJ5

 J9876

♣ QJ872

♠ QJ1065

 9876

 5

♣ 1093

♠ A984

 A102

 Q10432

♣ 4

South to make four no-trumps.  West leads the ♣Q.

Successful solvers:  Steve Bloom, Ian Budden, Leigh Matheson, Sebastian Nowacki, Radu Mihai, Wim van der Zijden

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Solution

We have eight top tricks and the Q makes nine.  Surely West can be thrown in to lead a diamond into South’s Q10?  So we try ducking the first club, winning the second and playing A and another heart.  But West wins with the K and returns a heart.  Now we have to cash the AK, A, K and K before throwing West in with a club, but West doggedly hangs on to two club winners, baring the J when South no longer has an entry.  We try various orders of play but they all come to the same thing.  Eventually the spade intermediates come to our attention: perhaps East can be thrown in after a spade to 10 and A and, when North and East are down to three spades each, a spade ducked.  To achieve that we have somehow to eliminate East’s hearts, and that can only be done by an immaterial squeeze.

North ducks the opening lead, wins the club continuation, cashes the AK, and leads a low spade to the 10 and A.  South discards a middle spade on the second club, East a low spade on the second diamond, West a diamond on the A.  Now comes a low heart from South in this position:

West does best to rise with the K and lead another club to North (a heart would give South two entries to establish diamonds).  South discards a diamond and comes to hand on a heart to cash the Q.  East cannot afford another spade discard, for that would let North establish a spade, so East has to part with a heart.  A heart to the Q now leaves the 3-card ending we sought: North leads a low spade and South plays high on this trick so that North’s K7 take the last two tricks.

♠ K73

 Q43

 none

♣ K6

♠ none

 KJ5

 J9

♣ J87

♠ QJ6

 9876

 none

♣ 10

♠ 94

 A102

 Q104

♣ none

West does best to rise with the K and lead another club to North (a heart would give South two entries to establish diamonds).  South discards a diamond and comes to hand on a heart to cash the Q.  East cannot afford another spade discard, for that would let North establish a spade, so East has to part with a heart.  A heart to the Q now leaves the 3-card ending we sought: North leads a low spade and South plays high on this trick so that North’s K7 take the last two tricks.

See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

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© Hugh Darwen, 2013

Date last modified: 11 March, 2017