Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 86

composed by Paolo Treossi
presented for solving in April, 2012

DR6

♠ 104

 Ay2

 AQ10

♣ 108765

♠ QJ9x

 K7y

 K987

♣ 32

♠ 8x5

 J10985

 654

♣ K4

♠ AK32

 Q6

 J32

♣ AQJ9

Replace the x’s by the 7 and 6, the y’s by the 3 and 4, 
so that East-West can defeat South’s contract of six no-trumps.  
How is the contract made if the x’s and y’s are placed differently?

Successful solvers:  Jean-Marc Bihl, Steve Bloom, Ian Budden, Vincent Labbé, Leigh Matheson, Sebastian Nowacki, Win van der Zijden

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Solution

The x’s and y’s must be placed as follows:

♠ 104

 A32

 AQ10

♣ 108765

♠ QJ96

 K74

 K987

♣ 32

♠ 875

 J10985

 654

♣ K4

♠ AK32

 Q6

 J32

♣ AQJ9

and West must lead a spade honour.  To show that the defence now prevails we consider declarer’s play when West holds either the 7 or the 3.  First, the 7:

♠ 104

 A32

 AQ10

♣ 108765

♠ QJ97

 K74

 K987

♣ 32

♠ 865

 J10985

 654

♣ K4

♠ AK32

 Q6

 J32

♣ AQJ9

South wins the spade lead, North playing the 10!  A diamond to the Q is followed by three rounds of clubs, South preserving the 9.  West does best to discard a heart on the third club but the 9 now brings about a seesaw squeeze in this position:

♠ 4

 A32

 A10

♣ 108

♠ J97

 K7

 K98

♣ none

♠ 86

 J10985

 6

♣ none

♠ A32

 Q6

 J3

♣ 9

A.      If West discards a spade¾preferably the 9¾North overtakes and an avoidance play in spades follows, allowing South to set up a long spade without letting East in.  Whatever West returns gives South an entry to make this long spade.

B.      If West discards a diamond, North plays low.  A diamond finesse comes next and now the minor suit winners squeeze both opponents.  West must come down to two spades and two hearts.  If East keeps three hearts, West is thrown in by A and another spade.  If East keeps two hearts, South loses a heart to establish one for North.

If East has the 7, line A fails.

Now consider declarer’s play when North has the 4:

♠ 104

 A42

 AQ10

♣ 108765

♠ QJ96

 K73

 K987

♣ 32

♠ 875

 J10985

 654

♣ K4

♠ AK32

 Q6

 J32

♣ AQJ9

This time North takes care to play the 4 on the opening lead.  Again declarer finesses the Q and plays on clubs.  This time West does best to discard diamonds, coming down to

♠ 10

 A42

 A10

♣ 108

♠ J96

 K73

 K9

♣ none

♠ 85

 J10985

 6

♣ none

♠ A32

 Q6

 J3

♣ 9

West discards another diamond on the 9 but is squeezed again when the remaining minor suit winners are cashed, ending with South’s J.  To avoid the throw-in, West keeps three hearts and the 6.  East keeps two hearts and two spades.  South leads the Q to K and A.  Now if East’s heart is high North cashes the 10 and loses a heart to East, whose last card is a losing spade.  But if East’s last heart is the 5, then North’s 4 comes into its own.

It follows that if North has the 3 instead of the 4 and North plays low on the opening spade lead, East-West must defend as indicated, West discarding diamonds on the clubs and East preserving the 5.

Successful solvers:  Jean-Marc Bihl, Steve Bloom, Ian Budden, Vincent Labbé, Leigh Matheson, Sebastian Nowacki, Win van der Zijden

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See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

© Hugh Darwen, 2012

Date last modified: 11 March, 2017