Double Dummy Corner

 

Competition Problem 34

composed by Jeff Richmond
presented for solving in December, 2007

DR6

♠ A

 K543

 AJ106

♣ 10964

♠ KJ109

 QJ109

 K943

♣ 2

♠ 87654

 876

 2

♣ QJ73

♠ Q32

 A2

 Q875

♣ AK85

South to make six no-trumps.  West leads the Q.

Successful solvers:  Steve Bloom, Ian Budden, Rajeswar Tewari, each of whom suggested DR6.  Nearly all of the remaining submissions omitted either or both of variations B and C  and also the "fourth variation".

Annual result, 2007: Steve Bloom is the runaway winner, with 54 Master Points (15 from composing) and 4 Star Points.  Wim van der Zijden is the runner-up with 35 (all from solving) and 1.  Ian Budden takes third place with 23 (6 from composing) and 2.

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Solution

North wins and leads the 10, covered by East (if not, see the final paragraph) and South.  South leads the 8, North overtaking even when West plays low.  The 9 is covered by East and South, who leads the 5, North winning as cheaply as possible.  North's 6 is allowed to hold (best), West discarding a diamond.  South comes to hand on the last club, forcing West to discard another diamond, coming down to three of each major suit:

♠ A

 543

 AJ or A6 or J6

♣ none

♠ KJ10

 J109

 none

♣ none

♠ 8765

 87

 none

♣ none

♠ Q32

 A

 Q7

♣ none

South's diamond lead now subjects West to a seesaw squeeze.  Which diamond South leads depends on which one West played on the second round:

A.      If it was the 4, South leads the 8 and North wins with the J or A depending on which major suit West now unguards.

B.      If it was the 9, South leads the 8 and North overtakes or ducks.

C.      If it was the K, South leads the Q and North plays the 6 or J.

The ace of the unguarded suit is followed by the last diamond to put the lead in the hand that now establishes a winner in that suit with the other ace as entry to it.

A fourth variation arises if East ducks the first two rounds of clubs.  In that case South comes to hand on a club, forcing West to discard a diamond.  This time South leads the Q, which holds, followed by a diamond to North's J.  The last club forces West to discard the K, allowing the seesaw squeeze to follow as before.

See the solution to Competition Problem #4 for the recommended tabular format if you prefer not to write in English prose.

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Hugh Darwen, 2007

Date last modified: 11 March, 2017